Healthcare of the Future (2/2)

In the summer of 2018, I gave the keynote speech at the Roche Days “Diagnostics in Dialogue”. I then noted a few very basic thoughts on the healthcare of the future. They have just been published by Roche. The first part is here; this is the second part of the slightly shortened text.

From patients to healthcare customers

Data-based knowledge of people’s sensitivities will also blur the boundaries between illness and health. The fact that people are not either 100 percent healthy or ill is not a new idea for the healthcare of the future. However, the broad data basis makes it possible not only to discover existing diseases. In the future, healthy people will also know a lot about the risks of potential diseases. This in turn raises the question of where the line between healthy and sick lies. The WHO defines health as a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being that goes far beyond the absence of illness or complaints. A forward-looking understanding.

Today’s patients depend on the data collection, evaluation and interpretation of their attending physician. In their perception, they are dependent on him. Patients of the future have the largest amount of data on their own health status and have access to their evaluation and interpretation. While classical patients look towards illness, symptoms and deficits, future customers focus on health. Patients become health customers.

Customers look for suitable service providers

Health customers are changing the health market with their attitude. They choose the right health service provider to optimize their state of health. Its attractiveness will depend on the added value it can deliver. It will be crucial for the successful service providers of the healthcare of the future to know exactly what the needs of potential customers are. They will analyse how each of their healthcare customers “ticks”, what their needs and expectations are and how best to communicate.

In the sense of “optimized” health, technologies could also be used in the world of tomorrow to expand or fully maintain bodily functions: The contact lens displays necessary information when needed. New organs are created in the 3D printer from the patient’s stem cells. Perhaps it will also be completely normal to order organ replacement from the doctor long before the first organ resigns.

Healthcare of the Future Michael Carl

Human – Machine Organisms

In the future, personal interaction will lose its central role today. People will increasingly experience that a machine simply understands them better. Communication with machines can be superior precisely because it follows clear structures and takes into account a multitude of data and parameters. If we continue to consistently think ahead, computers could become personal assistance systems that make calls on behalf of their owners, obtain information and offers at a frequency and perseverance that people would not be able to. Service providers in the healthcare of the future will have to adapt to this.

As a result, the way work is done will change completely. Where today we are talking about interfaces between man and machine, in the future we will look at man-machine organisms. In learning systems, algorithms will emancipate themselves as human tools. They will become de facto fully-fledged team members and will even take on management tasks.

New way of thinking

All these changes require a fundamentally new way of thinking and thus a change in corporate culture. In order to do justice to the possibilities and progress of digitalisation in the healthcare of the future, we must fundamentally rethink our ideas of values, quality and dealing with mistakes. Our way of thinking so far does not allow us to keep pace with the exponential pace of change. We must not just wait and see. We must act, even if we exceed our competencies and avoid good intentions. In the world of tomorrow, the maxim applies: Better to apologize afterwards than to ask for permission beforehand.

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